Updated: 7/12/2019

Cryptorchidism

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Topic
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Questions
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Evidence
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Introduction
  • Failure of testes to descend into the scrotum unilaterally or bilaterally
    • normally mediated by MIF + androgens
  • Testicle most commonly located in the inguinal canal
    • can also be intra-abdominal
  • Associated conditions
    • prematurity
    • Kallmann's syndrome
    • cystic fibrosis
    • testicular feminization
Treatment
  •  Orchidopexy
Prognosis, Prevention, and Complications
  • Prognosis
    • most descend by 3 months
    • if natural descent does not occur by this time it must be removed surgically by 2 years
  • Complications
    • infertility
      • reduced spermatogenesis due to ↑ body temperature
    • atrophy/hyalinization of the seminiferous tubules due to ↑ body temperature 
    • testicular torsion
    • seminoma/germ cell cancers
      • ↑ risk of development
      • risk also applies to contralateral testicle even if it descended normally
 

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Questions (1)

(M1.RP.12.71) A 2-year-old male is brought to his pediatrician by his parents because of a lack of testes in his scrotum. Physical examination confirms that testes are absent from the scrotal sac and palpable masses are found bilaterally around the inguinal canal. If the child’s condition is left untreated, levels of which of the following hormones is most likely to be decreased most when the child reaches sexual maturity? Tested Concept

QID: 101289
1

FSH

5%

(10/214)

2

LH

1%

(3/214)

3

Testosterone

53%

(114/214)

4

Inhibin

39%

(83/214)

5

Prolactin

1%

(2/214)

M 1 E

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Evidences (4)
Topic COMMENTS (6)
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