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3138 matches found 1 2 ... 157
QID: 104029
A 45-year-old man arrives by ambulance to the emergency room after being involved in a very severe construction accident. The patient was found unconscious with a large metal spike protruding from his abdomen by a coworker who was unable to estimate the amount of time the patient went without medical aid. Upon arrival to the ER, the patient was unconscious and unresponsive. His vital signs are BP: 80/40, HR: 120 bpm, RR: 25 bpm, Temperature: 97.1 degrees, and SPO2: 99%.He is taken to the operating room to remove the foreign body and control the bleeding. Although both objectives were accomplished, the patient had an acute drop in his blood pressure during the surgery at which time ST elevations were noted in multiple leads. This resolved with adequate fluid resuscitation and numerous blood transfusions. The patient remained sedated after surgery and continued to have relatively stable vital signs until his third day in the intensive care unit, when he experiences an oxygen desaturation of 85% despite being on a respirator with 100% oxygen at 15 breaths/minute. On auscultation air entry is present bilaterally with the presence of crackles. A 2/6 systolic murmur is heard. Readings from a Swan-Ganz catheter display the following: central venous pressure (CVP): 4 mmHg, right ventricular pressure (RVP) 20/5 mmHg, pulmonary artery pressure (PAP): 20/5 mmHg. Pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP): 5 mm Hg. A chest x-ray is shown as Image A. The patient dies soon after this episode. What is the most likely direct cause of his death?
  • Respiratory
  • - Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS)
3138 matches found 1 2 ... 157