Updated: 4/4/2018

Pulmonary Edema

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Introduction
  • pulmonary edemaFluid accumulation in air spaces and parenchyma of the lungs
    • leads to impaired gas exchange and may cause respiratory failure 
  • Pathophysiology
    • edema arises due to an imbalance in hydrostatic and/or oncotic pressure
      • increased hydrostatic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries (Pc)
        • cardiogenic causes (see below)
      • decreased oncotic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries (πc)
        • kidney or liver dysfunction (e.g. nephrotic syndrome, cirrhosis)
      • movement of fluid is driven by Starling forces
  • Causes
    • changes in pressure are of cardiogenic or non-cardiogenic origin
    • cardiogenic causes include
      • heart failure
        • left heart failure
        • volume overload
        • mitral stenosis
      • in all cases above, an increase in left ventricular end diastolic volume increases hydrostatic pressure in LV, LA, pulmonary vein, and pulmonary capillaries
        • the increase in hydrostatic pressure overwhelms the oncotic pressure in the pulmonary capillaries
        • a transudate leaks into the interstitial space and ultimately into the alveoli
    • non-cardiogenic causes include
      • infection
        • sepsis
        • pneumonia
      • aspiration
        • drowning
        • gastric aspiration
      • drugs
        • heroin
      • high altitude
      • ARDS
        • alveolar-capillary damage
Presentation
  • Symptoms
    • dyspnea
      • including orthopnea and paroxysymal nocturnal dyspnea (PND)
  • Physical exam 
    • bibasilar inspiratory crackles
      • due to air expanding fluid-filled alveoli
    • rusty-colored sputum
      • due to rupture of pulmonary capillaries from elevated hydrostatic pressure
    • wheezing
      • due to peribronchiolar edema
      • "cardiac asthma"
Evaluation
  • CXR
    • congestion in upper lobes
    • perihilar congestion
      • "bat wing configuration"
    • alveolar infiltrates
    • Kerley's lines 
      • due to septal edema
  • Biopsy
    • hemosiderin-laden alveolar macrophages ("heart failure cells")
      • macrophages phagocytose blood following rupture of capillaries
Treatment
  • Treat underlying condition
    • nitrates and diuretics used for cardiogenic causes
  • Respiratory support
    • Non-invasive positive pressure ventilation
    • supplemental oxygen 
 

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Questions (2)
Lab Values
Blood, Plasma, Serum Reference Range
ALT 8 - 20 U/L
Amylase, serum 25-125 U/L
AST 8-20 U/L
Bilirubin, serum (adult) Total // Direct 0.1-1.0 mg/dL // 0.0-0.3 mg/dL
Calcium, serum (Ca2+) 8.4-10.2 mg/dL
Cholesterol, serum Rec: < 200 mg/dL
Cortisol, serum 0800 h: 5-23 μg/dL //1600 h:
3-15 μg/dL
2000 h: <= 50% of 0800 h
Creatine kinase, serum Male: 25-90 U/L
Female: 10-70 U/L
Creatinine, serum 0.6-1.2 mg/dL
Electrolytes, serum  
Sodium (Na+) 136-145 mEq/L
Chloride (Cl-) 95-105 mEq/L
Potassium (K+) 3.5-5.0 mEq/L
Bicarbonate (HCO3-) 22-28 mEq/L
Magnesium (Mg2+) 1.5-2.0 mEq/L
Estriol, toal, serum (in pregnancy)  
24-28 wks // 32-36 wks 30-170 ng/mL // 60-280 ng/mL
28-32 wk // 36-40 wks 40-220 ng/mL // 80-350 ng/mL
Ferritin, serum Male: 15-200 ng/mL
Female: 12-150 ng/mL
Follicle-stimulating hormone, serum/plasma Male: 4-25 mIU/mL
Female: premenopause: 4-30 mIU/mL
midcycle peak: 10-90 mIU/mL
postmenopause: 40-250
pH 7.35-7.45
PCO2 33-45 mmHg
PO2 75-105 mmHg
Glucose, serum Fasting: 70 - 110 mg/dL
2-h postprandial:<120 mg/dL
Growth hormone - arginine stimulation Fasting: <5 ng/mL
provocative stimuli: > 7ng/mL
Immunoglobulins, serum  
IgA 76-390 mg/dL
IgE 0-380 IU/mL
IgG 650-1500 mg/dL
IgM 40-345 mg/dL
Iron 50-170 μg/dL
Lactate dehydrogenase, serum 45-90 U/L
Luteinizing hormone, serum/plasma Male: 6-23 mIU/mL
Female: follicular phase: 5-30 mIU/mL
midcycle: 75-150 mIU/mL
postmenopause 30-200 mIU/mL
Osmolality, serum 275-295 mOsmol/kd H2O
Parathyroid hormone, serume, N-terminal 230-630 pg/mL
Phosphatase (alkaline), serum (p-NPP at 30° C) 20-70 U/L
Phosphorus (inorganic), serum 3.0-4.5 mg/dL
Prolactin, serum (hPRL) < 20 ng/mL
Proteins, serum  
Total (recumbent) 6.0-7.8 g/dL
Albumin 3.5-5.5 g/dL
Globulin 2.3-3.5 g/dL
Thyroid-stimulating hormone, serum or plasma .5-5.0 μU/mL
Thyroidal iodine (123I) uptake 8%-30% of administered dose/24h
Thyroxine (T4), serum 5-12 μg/dL
Triglycerides, serum 35-160 mg/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3), serum (RIA) 115-190 ng/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3) resin uptake 25%-35%
Urea nitrogen, serum 7-18 mg/dL
Uric acid, serum 3.0-8.2 mg/dL
Hematologic Reference Range
Bleeding time (template) 2-7 minutes
Erythrocyte count Male: 4.3-5.9 million/mm^3
Female: 3.5-5.5 million mm^3
Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (Westergren) Male: 0-15 mm/h
Female: 0-20 mm/h
Hematocrit Male: 41%-53%
Female: 36%-46%
Hemoglobin A1c <=6 %
Hemoglobin, blood Male: 13.5-17.5 g/dL
Female: 12.0-16.0 g/dL
Hemoglobin, plasma 1-4 mg/dL
Leukocyte count and differential  
Leukocyte count 4,500-11,000/mm^3
Segmented neutrophils 54%-62%
Bands 3%-5%
Eosinophils 1%-3%
Basophils 0%-0.75%
Lymphocytes 25%-33%
Monocytes 3%-7%
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin 25.4-34.6 pg/cell
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration 31%-36% Hb/cell
Mean corpuscular volume 80-100 μm^3
Partial thromboplastin time (activated) 25-40 seconds
Platelet count 150,000-400,000/mm^3
Prothrombin time 11-15 seconds
Reticulocyte count 0.5%-1.5% of red cells
Thrombin time < 2 seconds deviation from control
Volume  
Plasma Male: 25-43 mL/kg
Female: 28-45 mL/kg
Red cell Male: 20-36 mL/kg
Female: 19-31 mL/kg
Cerebrospinal Fluid Reference Range
Cell count 0-5/mm^3
Chloride 118-132 mEq/L
Gamma globulin 3%-12% total proteins
Glucose 40-70 mg/dL
Pressure 70-180 mm H2O
Proteins, total < 40 mg/dL
Sweat Reference Range
Chloride 0-35 mmol/L
Urine  
Calcium 100-300 mg/24 h
Chloride Varies with intake
Creatinine clearance Male: 97-137 mL/min
Female: 88-128 mL/min
Estriol, total (in pregnancy)  
30 wks 6-18 mg/24 h
35 wks 9-28 mg/24 h
40 wks 13-42 mg/24 h
17-Hydroxycorticosteroids Male: 3.0-10.0 mg/24 h
Female: 2.0-8.0 mg/24 h
17-Ketosteroids, total Male: 8-20 mg/24 h
Female: 6-15 mg/24 h
Osmolality 50-1400 mOsmol/kg H2O
Oxalate 8-40 μg/mL
Potassium Varies with diet
Proteins, total < 150 mg/24 h
Sodium Varies with diet
Uric acid Varies with diet
Body Mass Index (BMI) Adult: 19-25 kg/m^2
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(M1.PL.102) A 65-year-old male with a past medical history of left ventricular hypertrophy presents to the emergency room because of a history of progressive shortness of breath and a cough productive of frothy pink sputum. Physical examination reveals crackles at the lung bases bilaterally. The patient denies fever, chills, or any recent infection. A radiograph of the chest shows septal lines and areas of opacification in both lung fields (see image).
Which of the following most likely accounts for this patient’s dyspnea? Review Topic

QID: 100905
FIGURES:
1

Obstruction of blood flow through pulmonary arteries

0%

(0/12)

2

Destruction of interalveolar septa

17%

(2/12)

3

Excess mucous production in bronchiolar epithelium

17%

(2/12)

4

A collection of air in the pleural space

0%

(0/12)

5

Alveolar and interstitial fluid accumulation

67%

(8/12)

M1

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