Updated: 9/18/2018

Chediak-Higashi Syndrome

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Snapshot
  • A 3-year-old boy is brought to his pediatrician with scraped knees. He had been playing and slipped, scraping his knees on the asphalt. His knees are severely infected, with visible pus. He has a history of bleeding gums and easy bruisability. On physical exam, he is febrile, his retina is noted to be pale, and his hair is very blonde. In fact, some parts of his hair are noted to be silver. He is started on broad-spectrum antibiotics.
Introduction
  • Primary immunodeficiency from problems with phagocytosis
  • Genetics
    • autosomal recessive
    • defect in lysosomal trafficking regulator gene LYST
  • Pathogenesis
    • microtubule dysfunction with failure of phagolysosome formation
    • defective secretions
    • defective melanization of melanosomes
  • Symptoms arise in childhood
Presentation
  • Symptoms
    • recurrent pyogenic infections, especially of the skin and soft tissue
      • Staphylococcus spp.
      • Streptococcus spp.
    • dermatologic symptoms
      • partial albinism
        • hypopigmentation of skin, eyes, and hair
      • photosensitivity
    • infiltrative lymphohistiocytosis
    • neurological symptoms
      • progressive neurodegeneration
      • peripheral neuropathy
    • pancytopenia
      • easy bruising
      • recurrent infections
      • bleeding
Evaluation
  • Diagnosis with light microscopy of peripheral blood smear
    • eosinophilic peroxidase-positive giant granules in neutrophils and platelets 
  • Bone marrow smear
    • giant lysosomes in leukocyte precursor cells
  • CBC showing pancytopenia
  • Mild coagulation defects
    • prolonged bleeding time
Differential Diagnosis
  • Leukocyte adhesion deficiency
  • Hyper IgM syndrome
Treatment
  • Early treatment is important
  • Bone marrow transplant
  • Treat infections as needed
Prognosis, Prevention, and Complications
  • Prognosis
    • fatal in childhood, usually before age 10
    • mortality due to lymphoproliferative syndrome
    • if the affected individual lives to adulthood, progressive neurologic dysfunction is a dominant feature
  • Complications
    • 50-85% develop accelerated phase called hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis
 

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Questions (2)
Lab Values
Blood, Plasma, Serum Reference Range
ALT 8-20 U/L
Amylase, serum 25-125 U/L
AST 8-20 U/L
Bilirubin, serum (adult) Total // Direct 0.1-1.0 mg/dL // 0.0-0.3 mg/dL
Calcium, serum (Ca2+) 8.4-10.2 mg/dL
Cholesterol, serum Rec: < 200 mg/dL
Cortisol, serum 0800 h: 5-23 μg/dL //1600 h:
3-15 μg/dL
2000 h: ≤ 50% of 0800 h
Creatine kinase, serum Male: 25-90 U/L
Female: 10-70 U/L
Creatinine, serum 0.6-1.2 mg/dL
Electrolytes, serum  
Sodium (Na+) 136-145 mEq/L
Chloride (Cl-) 95-105 mEq/L
Potassium (K+) 3.5-5.0 mEq/L
Bicarbonate (HCO3-) 22-28 mEq/L
Magnesium (Mg2+) 1.5-2.0 mEq/L
Estriol, total, serum (in pregnancy)  
24-28 wks // 32-36 wks 30-170 ng/mL // 60-280 ng/mL
28-32 wk // 36-40 wks 40-220 ng/mL // 80-350 ng/mL
Ferritin, serum Male: 15-200 ng/mL
Female: 12-150 ng/mL
Follicle-stimulating hormone, serum/plasma Male: 4-25 mIU/mL
Female: premenopause: 4-30 mIU/mL
midcycle peak: 10-90 mIU/mL
postmenopause: 40-250
pH 7.35-7.45
PCO2 33-45 mmHg
PO2 75-105 mmHg
Glucose, serum Fasting: 70-110 mg/dL
2-h postprandial:<120 mg/dL
Growth hormone - arginine stimulation Fasting: <5 ng/mL
Provocative stimuli: > 7ng/mL
Immunoglobulins, serum  
IgA 76-390 mg/dL
IgE 0-380 IU/mL
IgG 650-1500 mg/dL
IgM 40-345 mg/dL
Iron 50-170 μg/dL
Lactate dehydrogenase, serum 45-90 U/L
Luteinizing hormone, serum/plasma Male: 6-23 mIU/mL
Female: follicular phase: 5-30 mIU/mL
midcycle: 75-150 mIU/mL
postmenopause 30-200 mIU/mL
Osmolality, serum 275-295 mOsmol/kd H2O
Parathyroid hormone, serume, N-terminal 230-630 pg/mL
Phosphatase (alkaline), serum (p-NPP at 30° C) 20-70 U/L
Phosphorus (inorganic), serum 3.0-4.5 mg/dL
Prolactin, serum (hPRL) < 20 ng/mL
Proteins, serum  
Total (recumbent) 6.0-7.8 g/dL
Albumin 3.5-5.5 g/dL
Globulin 2.3-3.5 g/dL
Thyroid-stimulating hormone, serum or plasma .5-5.0 μU/mL
Thyroidal iodine (123I) uptake 8%-30% of administered dose/24h
Thyroxine (T4), serum 5-12 μg/dL
Triglycerides, serum 35-160 mg/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3), serum (RIA) 115-190 ng/dL
Triiodothyronine (T3) resin uptake 25%-35%
Urea nitrogen, serum 7-18 mg/dL
Uric acid, serum 3.0-8.2 mg/dL
Hematologic Reference Range
Bleeding time 2-7 minutes
Erythrocyte count Male: 4.3-5.9 million/mm3
Female: 3.5-5.5 million mm3
Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (Westergren) Male: 0-15 mm/h
Female: 0-20 mm/h
Hematocrit Male: 41%-53%
Female: 36%-46%
Hemoglobin A1c ≤ 6 %
Hemoglobin, blood Male: 13.5-17.5 g/dL
Female: 12.0-16.0 g/dL
Hemoglobin, plasma 1-4 mg/dL
Leukocyte count and differential  
Leukocyte count 4,500-11,000/mm3
Segmented neutrophils 54%-62%
Bands 3%-5%
Eosinophils 1%-3%
Basophils 0%-0.75%
Lymphocytes 25%-33%
Monocytes 3%-7%
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin 25.4-34.6 pg/cell
Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration 31%-36% Hb/cell
Mean corpuscular volume 80-100 μm3
Partial thromboplastin time (activated) 25-40 seconds
Platelet count 150,000-400,000/mm3
Prothrombin time 11-15 seconds
Reticulocyte count 0.5%-1.5% of red cells
Thrombin time < 2 seconds deviation from control
Volume  
Plasma Male: 25-43 mL/kg
Female: 28-45 mL/kg
Red cell Male: 20-36 mL/kg
Female: 19-31 mL/kg
Cerebrospinal Fluid Reference Range
Cell count 0-5/mm3
Chloride 118-132 mEq/L
Gamma globulin 3%-12% total proteins
Glucose 40-70 mg/dL
Pressure 70-180 mm H2O
Proteins, total < 40 mg/dL
Sweat Reference Range
Chloride 0-35 mmol/L
Urine  
Calcium 100-300 mg/24 h
Chloride Varies with intake
Creatinine clearance Male: 97-137 mL/min
Female: 88-128 mL/min
Estriol, total (in pregnancy)  
30 wks 6-18 mg/24 h
35 wks 9-28 mg/24 h
40 wks 13-42 mg/24 h
17-Hydroxycorticosteroids Male: 3.0-10.0 mg/24 h
Female: 2.0-8.0 mg/24 h
17-Ketosteroids, total Male: 8-20 mg/24 h
Female: 6-15 mg/24 h
Osmolality 50-1400 mOsmol/kg H2O
Oxalate 8-40 μg/mL
Potassium Varies with diet
Proteins, total < 150 mg/24 h
Sodium Varies with diet
Uric acid Varies with diet
Body Mass Index (BMI) Adult: 19-25 kg/m2
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(M1.IM.74) A 13-year-old boy presents to his pediatrician for a routine visit. He states that he has been in good health with the exception of repeated staphylococcal infections despite adequate treatment. On exam, the pediatrician observes the findings demonstrated in Figure A, as well as nystagmus. The pediatrician subsequently order a peripheral blood smear which is demonstrated in Figure B. Which of the following is the most likely mode of inheritance of this patient's condition? Review Topic

QID: 106680
FIGURES:
1

Autosomal dominant

8%

(12/142)

2

X-linked recessive

30%

(43/142)

3

X-linked dominant

4%

(5/142)

4

Autosomal recessive

56%

(79/142)

5

Maternal inheritance

0%

(0/142)

M1

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